lizardbeans:

Sashi does THE THING

lizardbeans:

Sashi does THE THING

n3113h:

Little Runt Male 

"Rusty" Orange Tiger Het. Hypo
Hatched the last week of April. 
$30, plus priority overnight shipping! 

I’m wanting this little sweetheart to go to the perfect forever home, if any of you are interested, please shoot me an Ask or email me (n3113hreptiles@hotmail.com)! 

Thank you!

n3113h:

Little Runt Male

"Rusty" Orange Tiger Het. Hypo
Hatched the last week of April.
$30, plus priority overnight shipping!

I’m wanting this little sweetheart to go to the perfect forever home, if any of you are interested, please shoot me an Ask or email me (n3113hreptiles@hotmail.com)!

Thank you!

reptiglo:

tegusaurusrex:
Helpful chart for anyone who is still thinks that reptiliaherp’s blood python is overweight. 
Spoiler Alert: he is not

reptiglo:

:

Helpful chart for anyone who is still thinks that reptiliaherp’s blood python is overweight. 

Spoiler Alert: he is not

gears-keep-turning:

Hey Baird! I can actually see you in this cube now!

gears-keep-turning:

Hey Baird! I can actually see you in this cube now!

crispysnakes:


USARK - United States Association of Reptile Keepers
 
West Virginia Action AlertDeadline August 1 at NoonLinks to the Action Alerts and more information can be found atwww.usark.org/2014-blog/west-virginia-dwa/.Thanks to grassroots efforts in WV, hundreds of residents have already contacted officials and made an impact. Now it is time for another push of comments. The deadline is August 1 at noon. The fight continues… The Chairperson of the WV DWA (Dangerous Wild Animals) Board said she wants the subcommittee to begin again and create a new list with fewer species. However, the entire process has been severely flawed and conducted carelessly. The original proposed list of DWAs included thousands of species due to bias from designated officials against harmless, exotic and non-traditional pets.Please join the WV Chapter of USARC group at www.facebook.com/pages/WV-Chapter-of-USARC/747291521995383 for frequent updates.Photo with Brazilian Rainbow boa © M. W. Meador Photography

We’re making a difference!  

WV Residents can submit their comments here.
Non-WV residents can submit their comments here.

If you don’t remember this very recent issue, some history:


USARK has remained active in West Virginia after the passing of their Dangerous Wild Animals Act. The final proposed list of animals to be listed includes thousands of species. The 5 page list includes entire Orders and Families, rather than just single species. Common pets on the list include all Tetra fish, hamsters (only one species is excluded), hedgehogs, all turtles and tortoises (except WV native species), all salamanders and newts, ferrets, all Goby fish, Sugar gliders and many more. The list can be viewed at www.usark.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/WV-DWA-List-and-Comment.pdf. Pet keepers with these species will be subject to a $100 annual permit per animal, among other restrictions.It would take 64 pages to list individually all the reptile and amphibian species proposed to be banned by WV Prop. Rule 61-30. (That’s on 8.5″ x 11″ paper, single spaced, small font, with one line for the scientific and common name for each species). There are 1008 reptiles and 2185 amphibians included in the proposed ban. Reptiles and amphibians occupy less than 20% of the space on the proposed list. The list also includes broad scientific categories of birds, crayfish, snails, fish and mammals.


This fight continues and the 30 day comment period began last week (as we announced on Facebook HERE). Please join WV USARC group at www.facebook.com/pages/WV-Chapter-of-USARC/747291521995383 for updates, information and steps to help.Thanks to the dedicated work of Rick Stanley, Jennifer Phillips Ozzbourne, the Meador family and numerous other WV herpers, efforts already have a solid foundation and continue to increase.

crispysnakes:

 

West Virginia Action Alert
Deadline August 1 at Noon

Links to the Action Alerts and more information can be found atwww.usark.org/2014-blog/west-virginia-dwa/.

Thanks to grassroots efforts in WV, hundreds of residents have already contacted officials and made an impact. Now it is time for another push of comments. The deadline is August 1 at noon. The fight continues… 

The Chairperson of the WV DWA (Dangerous Wild Animals) Board said she wants the subcommittee to begin again and create a new list with fewer species. However, the entire process has been severely flawed and conducted carelessly. The original proposed list of DWAs included thousands of species due to bias from designated officials against harmless, exotic and non-traditional pets.

Please join the WV Chapter of USARC group at www.facebook.com/pages/
WV-Chapter-of-USARC/747291521995383 for frequent updates.

Photo with Brazilian Rainbow boa © M. W. Meador Photography
We’re making a difference!  
WV Residents can submit their comments here.
Non-WV residents can submit their comments here.
If you don’t remember this very recent issue, some history:
USARK has remained active in West Virginia after the passing of their Dangerous Wild Animals Act. The final proposed list of animals to be listed includes thousands of species. The 5 page list includes entire Orders and Families, rather than just single species. Common pets on the list include all Tetra fish, hamsters (only one species is excluded), hedgehogs, all turtles and tortoises (except WV native species), all salamanders and newts, ferrets, all Goby fish, Sugar gliders and many more. The list can be viewed at www.usark.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/WV-DWA-List-and-Comment.pdf. Pet keepers with these species will be subject to a $100 annual permit per animal, among other restrictions.

It would take 64 pages to list individually all the reptile and amphibian species proposed to be banned by WV Prop. Rule 61-30. (That’s on 8.5″ x 11″ paper, single spaced, small font, with one line for the scientific and common name for each species). There are 1008 reptiles and 2185 amphibians included in the proposed ban. Reptiles and amphibians occupy less than 20% of the space on the proposed list. The list also includes broad scientific categories of birds, crayfish, snails, fish and mammals.
This fight continues and the 30 day comment period began last week (as we announced on Facebook HERE). Please join WV USARC group at www.facebook.com/pages/WV-Chapter-of-USARC/747291521995383 for updates, information and steps to help.

Thanks to the dedicated work of Rick Stanley, Jennifer Phillips Ozzbourne, the Meador family and numerous other WV herpers, efforts already have a solid foundation and continue to increase.

sir-p-audax:

I had a tea party with Ophelia. She wanted to tip over the sugar jar. The bow is nice.

n3113h:

I’m most likely adopting this lovely male from a friend on mine. 
He has a wobble, but I’m willing to work with him. Look how gorgeous he is though!

n3113h:

I’m most likely adopting this lovely male from a friend on mine.
He has a wobble, but I’m willing to work with him. Look how gorgeous he is though!

crispysnakes:








USARK - United States Association of Reptile Keepers

Read this Lacey Act article by Kassandra Royer of Royer Reptiles. You’ll learn something. Then, comment against the Constrictor Rule if you haven’t at www.usark.org/2014-blog/constrictor-rule-1/. And share!"There is an ever-expanding piece of law called ‘the Lacey Act’ that has been around since 1900. It was created to help stop the massive slaughter of native game animals for export by commercial hunters. Today, it does a lot more than that, as government likes to keep adding to their lists of things to do.Perhaps one of the most useless pieces of the Lacey Act is the “Injurious Wildlife List.” Injurious means “causing or likely to cause harm.” The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, which is responsible for enforcing this monster, defines Injurious Species as: ” Injurious wildlife are mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles, fish, crustaceans, mollusks and their offspring or gametes that are injurious to the interests of human beings, agriculture, horticulture, forestry, wildlife or wildlife resources of the United States. Plants and organisms other than those listed above cannot be listed as injurious wildlife.”When a species is added to the Injurious Wildlife list, it makes it a federal crime to transport that species across state lines. You can keep them, breed them and sell them- within your own state- but you can’t take them if you need to move across the country, and you can’t sell them to someone outside your state.Take a look at the mammals that are currently classified as “Injurious Wildlife”Flying Fox (Fruit Bat)MongooseEuropean Rabbits Raccoon dogBrushtail possumIndian Wild Dog aka DholeMultimammat mouse aka Soft-furred ratHow many do you recognize? How many have you heard about on the news? Any hint that fruit bats or Indian wild dogs are invading the United States and wreaking havoc? Lots of brushtailed possums damaging agriculture? Seen a mongoose lately? Nope. The only animal you’re probably familiar with on that list is the European Rabbit. They are literally everywhere in the United States. They’re all over, fully established feral populations- but if you transport one across state lines- that would be a federal offense. Nevermind that all the domestic rabbits came from the European rabbit…The flying fox is invasive in Australia. Brushtailed possums have colonized New Zealand, and the mongoose is invasive on several tropical islands. The Raccoon Dog is invasive in North Europe.The Indian Wild Dog is not only NOT invasive, it’s now classified as Endangered in what is left of it’s native territory. It is classified as injurious because it kills livestock in it’s home country… A similar situation exists for the multimammate mouse- they cause damage in their native African habitats, but they have not invaded any other countries.Remember the definition which clearly stated the species had to be detriment to the United States? Only the mongoose qualifies, since they are in Hawaii…though the mongoose was listed 59 years before Hawaii became a state. Legislators heard some scary news from other countries and dropped the ban hammer, with little to no consideration of whether or not those animals actually pose a risk to the U.S.Now- let’s take note of which mammals are missing from this list:The wild boar is conspicuously absent. These invasive mammals cause damage to the United States agricultural sector and environment estimated at 1.5 BILLION dollars *per year*. NOT LISTED AS INJURIOUS.The common house mouse as well as the black and brown rats are NOT native species- we brought them over from Europe! They are responsible for crop and property damage to the tune of over $19 billion dollars a year in the United States. NOT LISTED AS INJURIOUSNutria (a beaver sized water rat) are yet another introduced species which can now be found in 40 states. Each year- in the United States, mind you, not some distant country- they are responsible for a minimum of one million dollars worth of damage by wrecking levees, banks and roadbeds with their burrowing activities. NOT LISTED AS INJURIOUS.You might say, “Well, the rats and nutria have been here forever!” Okay, I see where you are coming from, but remember the Fish & Wildlife Service still thinks the European Rabbit needs to be on the list, and they’ve been around “forever” as well.Two of the first animals added to the Injurious list were the European Starling and the House Sparrow . Yep- those are also not native to North America! They have displaced native species and have been causing crop damage valued at as much as 800 million per year.- They were removed from the Injurious List in 1960 because regulators realized having them listed ***DID NOTHING*** to prevent them from spreading. You don’t say?In the 113+ years that the Lacey Act has been around, dozens of species have been added, most of them very damaging aquatic species (fish, mollusks & crustaceans) Since those species can spread themselves without any help just by traveling through waterways, having them listed is virtually useless as well.It wasn’t until 1990 that a reptile was added to the Injurious Species List- the Brown Tree Snake. You won’t find any in the United States, either. They became invasive in Guam, which, if we are nitpicking- is a US “territory”.In 2012, more species were added- big, “scary” snakes- the Burmese python, yellow anaconda and two subspecies of African Rock Python. Anacondas have never colonized outside of their native south american habitat, anywhere in the whole world. There are no invasive colonies in the United States today. The same is true of the Rock Pythons.The Burmese python- due to the destruction of import facilities by Hurricane Andrew in 1992- were able to establish a small colony in the Everglades. It has been 22 years and they have failed to expand outside of southern Florida. Cold spells in the winters of 2008 and 2010 demonstrated that the Everglades Burmese pythons cannot tolerate temperatures near freezing.Are the Burmese invasive in the Everglades? Absolutely. What is not being said is that a full 25% of the animal life and nearly half of the plant species found in South Florida are NON NATIVE!Now the Fish & Wildlife Service wants to add even more species to the list! They want to go ahead and throw in the other three species of anaconda- even though they are rare in captivity, and have never, ever established an invasive population- not even in the Everglades! They’re also after the famous boa constrictors- which are also not invasive or damaging to anyone, anywhere in the United States. As a matter of fact, there are boas that are native to northern Mexico- if the boa could expand further north, nature would have run that course all by herself! Also on the list- the Reticulated python- which has the impressive record of never having established a colony outside of it’s native range, EVER- and there are no wild colonies in the United States.These species clearly do not fit the definition of Injurious wildlife given by USF&W- but they do represent people’s pets and a niche industry that focuses on the *captive* breeding of fantastically colored versions of these snakes that sell for thousands of dollars both domestically and overseas.With over a century of history under it’s belt, it’s glaringly obvious that the Lacey Act is 100% ineffective at preventing the spread of invasive animals in the U.S. Moreover, the law doesn’t even attempt to curb the activity of the absolute worst of the worst injurious wildlife species- instead focusing on those animals with sensational taglines that “might” possibly be injurious. If it were not so injurious to the US Citizen, the Injurious Wildlife list would quite the joke.Only two things will be accomplished by the addition of these species to the Lacey Act- the destruction of dreams, and the bankrupting of small businesses.http://www.fws.gov/le/pdf/CurrentListInjuriousWildlife.pdf/" - Kassandra RoyerThanks, Kassandra! The reptile community is stronger with people such as yourself working on our behalf.Photo: Boa constrictor longicauda © USARK - United States Association of Reptile Keepers

crispysnakes:


Read this Lacey Act article by Kassandra Royer of Royer Reptiles. You’ll learn something. Then, comment against the Constrictor Rule if you haven’t at www.usark.org/2014-blog/constrictor-rule-1/. And share!

"There is an ever-expanding piece of law called ‘the Lacey Act’ that has been around since 1900. It was created to help stop the massive slaughter of native game animals for export by commercial hunters. Today, it does a lot more than that, as government likes to keep adding to their lists of things to do.

Perhaps one of the most useless pieces of the Lacey Act is the “Injurious Wildlife List.” Injurious means “causing or likely to cause harm.” The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, which is responsible for enforcing this monster, defines Injurious Species as: ” Injurious wildlife are mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles, fish, crustaceans, mollusks and their offspring or gametes that are injurious to the interests of human beings, agriculture, horticulture, forestry, wildlife or wildlife resources of the United States. Plants and organisms other than those listed above cannot be listed as injurious wildlife.”

When a species is added to the Injurious Wildlife list, it makes it a federal crime to transport that species across state lines. You can keep them, breed them and sell them- within your own state- but you can’t take them if you need to move across the country, and you can’t sell them to someone outside your state.

Take a look at the mammals that are currently classified as “Injurious Wildlife”

Flying Fox (Fruit Bat)
Mongoose
European Rabbits 
Raccoon dog
Brushtail possum
Indian Wild Dog aka Dhole
Multimammat mouse aka Soft-furred rat

How many do you recognize? How many have you heard about on the news? Any hint that fruit bats or Indian wild dogs are invading the United States and wreaking havoc? Lots of brushtailed possums damaging agriculture? Seen a mongoose lately? Nope. The only animal you’re probably familiar with on that list is the European Rabbit. They are literally everywhere in the United States. They’re all over, fully established feral populations- but if you transport one across state lines- that would be a federal offense. Nevermind that all the domestic rabbits came from the European rabbit…

The flying fox is invasive in Australia. Brushtailed possums have colonized New Zealand, and the mongoose is invasive on several tropical islands. The Raccoon Dog is invasive in North Europe.
The Indian Wild Dog is not only NOT invasive, it’s now classified as Endangered in what is left of it’s native territory. It is classified as injurious because it kills livestock in it’s home country… A similar situation exists for the multimammate mouse- they cause damage in their native African habitats, but they have not invaded any other countries.

Remember the definition which clearly stated the species had to be detriment to the United States? Only the mongoose qualifies, since they are in Hawaii…though the mongoose was listed 59 years before Hawaii became a state. Legislators heard some scary news from other countries and dropped the ban hammer, with little to no consideration of whether or not those animals actually pose a risk to the U.S.

Now- let’s take note of which mammals are missing from this list:
The wild boar is conspicuously absent. These invasive mammals cause damage to the United States agricultural sector and environment estimated at 1.5 BILLION dollars *per year*. NOT LISTED AS INJURIOUS.

The common house mouse as well as the black and brown rats are NOT native species- we brought them over from Europe! They are responsible for crop and property damage to the tune of over $19 billion dollars a year in the United States. NOT LISTED AS INJURIOUS

Nutria (a beaver sized water rat) are yet another introduced species which can now be found in 40 states. Each year- in the United States, mind you, not some distant country- they are responsible for a minimum of one million dollars worth of damage by wrecking levees, banks and roadbeds with their burrowing activities. NOT LISTED AS INJURIOUS.

You might say, “Well, the rats and nutria have been here forever!” Okay, I see where you are coming from, but remember the Fish & Wildlife Service still thinks the European Rabbit needs to be on the list, and they’ve been around “forever” as well.

Two of the first animals added to the Injurious list were the European Starling and the House Sparrow . Yep- those are also not native to North America! They have displaced native species and have been causing crop damage valued at as much as 800 million per year.- They were removed from the Injurious List in 1960 because regulators realized having them listed ***DID NOTHING*** to prevent them from spreading. You don’t say?

In the 113+ years that the Lacey Act has been around, dozens of species have been added, most of them very damaging aquatic species (fish, mollusks & crustaceans) Since those species can spread themselves without any help just by traveling through waterways, having them listed is virtually useless as well.

It wasn’t until 1990 that a reptile was added to the Injurious Species List- the Brown Tree Snake. You won’t find any in the United States, either. They became invasive in Guam, which, if we are nitpicking- is a US “territory”.

In 2012, more species were added- big, “scary” snakes- the Burmese python, yellow anaconda and two subspecies of African Rock Python. Anacondas have never colonized outside of their native south american habitat, anywhere in the whole world. There are no invasive colonies in the United States today. The same is true of the Rock Pythons.

The Burmese python- due to the destruction of import facilities by Hurricane Andrew in 1992- were able to establish a small colony in the Everglades. It has been 22 years and they have failed to expand outside of southern Florida. Cold spells in the winters of 2008 and 2010 demonstrated that the Everglades Burmese pythons cannot tolerate temperatures near freezing.

Are the Burmese invasive in the Everglades? Absolutely. What is not being said is that a full 25% of the animal life and nearly half of the plant species found in South Florida are NON NATIVE!

Now the Fish & Wildlife Service wants to add even more species to the list! They want to go ahead and throw in the other three species of anaconda- even though they are rare in captivity, and have never, ever established an invasive population- not even in the Everglades! 

They’re also after the famous boa constrictors- which are also not invasive or damaging to anyone, anywhere in the United States. As a matter of fact, there are boas that are native to northern Mexico- if the boa could expand further north, nature would have run that course all by herself! Also on the list- the Reticulated python- which has the impressive record of never having established a colony outside of it’s native range, EVER- and there are no wild colonies in the United States.

These species clearly do not fit the definition of Injurious wildlife given by USF&W- but they do represent people’s pets and a niche industry that focuses on the *captive* breeding of fantastically colored versions of these snakes that sell for thousands of dollars both domestically and overseas.

With over a century of history under it’s belt, it’s glaringly obvious that the Lacey Act is 100% ineffective at preventing the spread of invasive animals in the U.S. Moreover, the law doesn’t even attempt to curb the activity of the absolute worst of the worst injurious wildlife species- instead focusing on those animals with sensational taglines that “might” possibly be injurious. If it were not so injurious to the US Citizen, the Injurious Wildlife list would quite the joke.

Only two things will be accomplished by the addition of these species to the Lacey Act- the destruction of dreams, and the bankrupting of small businesses.

http://www.fws.gov/le/pdf/CurrentListInjuriousWildlife.pdf/" - Kassandra Royer

Thanks, Kassandra! The reptile community is stronger with people such as yourself working on our behalf.

Photo: Boa constrictor longicauda © USARK - United States Association of Reptile Keepers
n3113h:

peacethroughharakiri:

jetstreamsamofficial:

The 3D on this thing is unreal.

the amount of shit wrong in this picture is truly disgusting….i’m not even going to get started,….. n3113h or reptiliaherps, either of yall know the story on this one, if its a rescue that’s one thing but i highly doubt it.

Oh my god. Look at that poor things shell. Is the owner just not giving proper UVB lighting or something, or was it a rescue? Jeez. That’s just so bad. :(

n3113h:

peacethroughharakiri:

jetstreamsamofficial:

The 3D on this thing is unreal.

the amount of shit wrong in this picture is truly disgusting….i’m not even going to get started,….. n3113h or reptiliaherps, either of yall know the story on this one, if its a rescue that’s one thing but i highly doubt it.

Oh my god. Look at that poor things shell. Is the owner just not giving proper UVB lighting or something, or was it a rescue? Jeez. That’s just so bad. :(

buggirl:

I recently posted a photo such as this, where I’m holding Linda the Black Widow,  on my blog and the comments coming in are kinda cracking me up.
Here are a few:
“what is photoshop”-
Well, if you knew me personally, you’d understand why this is funny.  I am so computer illiterate I could never use photoshop- you’re lucky I know how to use tumblr…. Also, if you follow me, you know I hold all things “creepy” on a regular basis.
“this bitch really let a venomous spider bite her trying to be cute”
Apparently, I’m a bitch?  And who said Linda bit me?  I didn’t!  Black Widows are extremely shy and non-aggressive.  They are nothing to be afraid of, like any animal, if treated with respect (which usually means just leave it alone) and not threatened, they will not feel the need to defend themselves.  I was not “trying to be cute”..  The point of this blog is to educate others about the natural world.  Me holding a venomous beneficial black widow reinforces the point- most of the negative feelings people have towards spiders are based on irrational fear.
“Now they call her rotten hand”
Once again, you’d practically have to force a black widow to bite you.  Also, even if she were to bite me, it certainly would not rot my hand.  Black widow venom is a nuerotoxin, and does not cause necrosis.
Spread a little love to spiders and read about my research here.

buggirl:

I recently posted a photo such as this, where I’m holding Linda the Black Widow,  on my blog and the comments coming in are kinda cracking me up.

Here are a few:

what is photoshop”-

Well, if you knew me personally, you’d understand why this is funny.  I am so computer illiterate I could never use photoshop- you’re lucky I know how to use tumblr…. Also, if you follow me, you know I hold all things “creepy” on a regular basis.

this bitch really let a venomous spider bite her trying to be cute

Apparently, I’m a bitch?  And who said Linda bit me?  I didn’t!  Black Widows are extremely shy and non-aggressive.  They are nothing to be afraid of, like any animal, if treated with respect (which usually means just leave it alone) and not threatened, they will not feel the need to defend themselves.  I was not “trying to be cute”..  The point of this blog is to educate others about the natural world.  Me holding a venomous beneficial black widow reinforces the point- most of the negative feelings people have towards spiders are based on irrational fear.

Now they call her rotten hand”

Once again, you’d practically have to force a black widow to bite you.  Also, even if she were to bite me, it certainly would not rot my hand.  Black widow venom is a nuerotoxin, and does not cause necrosis.

Spread a little love to spiders and read about my research here.